Posts in News
SCIENCE NEWS: IYAK Genetically Outperforming Tibetan Yak

IYAK genetics: Remarkable, exceptional and wild!

Our registered animals are out-performing the Tibetan domestic and wild-types on several genetic and phenotypic fronts. Its a very special population in the world. IYAK is a truly unique and valuable herd. UINC estimates indicate Tibetan wild yak are "Vulnerable" and dropping 2% per year (2014), and new counts suggest wild yak may already be endangered. IYAK may soon be the last strong hold of the original, ancient and pure genetics (if we continue to protect it)!  

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Yak Stops Global Warming?

If Climate Change is your concern, Yak is your answer

… UN Special Report confirms the urgent need to reduce methane emission… Whats interesting is that yak significantly reduce methane emissions compared with standard cattle breeds. New research in 2016, by one of my favorite researchers suggests yak could be a key solution in the battle against Global Warming (Zhigang Zhang… That yak are a healthy alternative to cattle is just one more reason to love yak. Get on board!

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IYAK SCIENTIFIC FIRST: Ground Breaking Genome Sequence Research

“The Only Test of It’s Kind Anywhere in the World” IYAK Did It In 2018! Next Stop the whole tamale

I am excited to report that the International Yak Association is singlehandedly responsible for the development of exciting and groundbreaking technology and DNA testing for North American Yak (NAY). It is a scientific first of great importance to breeders, consumers, and academic researchers of NAY. Let me tell you a little about our preliminary results. 

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A globally important wild yak Bos mutus population in the Arjinshan Nature Reserve, Xinjiang, China

ORIGINALLY POSTED AS A SHORT COMMUNICATION BY PAUL J. BUZZARD et al.

Wild Yak are IUCN Red Listed and Class 1 in China

The wild yak Bos mutus is one of the most charismatic members of the Tibet/Qinghai Plateau fauna, and 19th century explorers to the plateau described vast herds. Overhunting, in particular, has greatly reduced wild yak populations and forced them into remote areas. The species is categorized as Vulnerable on the IUCN Red List and as a Class 1 protected animal

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